The Importance of Proper Form When Strength Training

I freely admit that I’m a complete nerd when it comes to studying proper form when strength training. I even go so far as to analyze videos on YouTube and Instagram and critique the form of the posters. I’m sure that this is partly due to a slight case of OCD, but much of it is rooted in a desire to achieve maximum results when weight training and to avoid injury.

Why does this matter so much? As BJJ practitioners (and especially for 40 plus practitioners), and as human beings with busy lives, we need to make every moment and effort count. This is especially true with regard to our hobbies so that we can have more time available for family and career. And it allows us to have more energy and time to devote to our BJJ practice. Studying a martial can be taxing enough, especially as we age, so it’s important for our supplementary training to be as efficient as possible.

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In a previous post, I did a review of Pavel Tsatsouline’s Simple & Sinister book and program. You can access that post here. One of the most important insights that Pavel shares is that with the Simple & Sinister program, we can do the bare minimum of work to maintain strength and mobility so that we don’t detract from whatever our primary pursuit is, whether it’s a martial art, law enforcement, or spec ops. We should train enough to keep our bodies ready for action, but not so much that we’re too fatigued to do our primary work. And for those of us 40 plus practitioners who sometimes have many more work and family commitments, this approach can be especially helpful for how we manage our time.

I would argue that this applies equally to using proper form when training. Whenever I see a video of someone using momentum to move a weight or not using full range of motion, I privately lament how inefficient their use of time is. Furthermore, much of the poor form I see also increases the chances for injury.

In BJJ, we need to develop strength and mobility throughout the entire range of motion, and this often extends into ranges of motion that don’t always come naturally to our physiques. Practicing our strength training with mindfulness, awareness, and conviction has multiple benefits. First, as mentioned earlier, it enables us to develop strength throughout the entire range of motion. Second, it allows us to practice and burn into our muscle memory the safest and most efficient ways of performing the primary muscle movements (push, pull, hip hinge) so that we can perform these movements more efficiently during our BJJ training. Third, it enables a mindset with regard to training that teaches us to train any and all muscles movements with care and precision, which increases the likelihood that we’ll utilize better control when we’re rolling. This is safer and more efficient. As a 40 plus BJJ practitioner, I find that focusing on form is especially important for staying safe, healthy, and injury free.

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I would encourage all BJJ practitioners to read Pavel’s Simple & Sinister as well as checking out Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength, anything that Dan John has written, as well as Scott Iardella’s series of books on strength training. All of these authors are at the top of the strength training field, and they all write in a clear and accessible manner. I’ve reaped enormous benefits from following their books, blogs, and podcasts and I consider their writing a must for any martial artist.

Dan John
Before We Go: An Ongoing Philosophy of Lifting, Living and Learning
Fat Loss Happens on Monday: Habit-Based Diet & Workout Hacks

Mark Rippetoe
Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition

Scott Iardella
The Edge of Strength: An Unconventional Guide To Live Your Strength And Discover Your Greatness
The Shock And Awe Protocol: Kettlebell Training For Size And Strength

Pavel Tsatsouline
Kettlebell Simple & Sinister

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